The Grammys Interest Level Plummets Among Downtown Eugene Residents

The residents of downtown Eugene show disinterest in tuning in to watch the 2013 Grammy Awards, and are quick to criticize mainstream music and pop culture.

By Julianne Parker

Last year, 39.9 million viewers tuned in to watch the Grammys. Evidently, few of those viewers were Eugene residents.

“I won’t be watching the Grammys,” said Jeremy Lee, a Eugene resident. “That would be two hours of my life I’d never get back.”

Lee is not alone in his lack of enthusiasm to tune in to watch the 55th Annual Grammy Awards that will be airing on Sunday evening. Several other Eugene residents expressed a similar disinterest and lack of support for what many believe is now an awards ceremony focused less on a celebration of music, and more on a celebration of stardom.

A group of men standing outside of their rehabilitation center in downtown Eugene scoffed at the idea of watching the Grammys, or of listening to the music that is up for nomination.

The men stood outside of their rehabilitation center in downtown Eugene, but requested to not be photographed.

The men stood outside of their rehabilitation center in downtown Eugene, but requested to not be photographed.

“Most of the music they nominate, I don’t listen to,” said Justin Jones. “It’s not a part of my generation.”

For these men, the only appealing part of the Grammys has been taken away with the establishment of new dress code regulations for attendees. According to The Washington Post, a wardrobe advisory was sent out to Grammy attendees by CBS, the broadcasting company airing the awards show, asking the guests to cover up “bare fleshy under curves of the buttocks, and bare sides or under curvature of the breasts”, and to also avoid wearing sheer clothing.

“It’s funny because the Grammys have rules now for what they have to wear,” said Parker Jones, Justin’s brother. “They’re trying to get women to actually wear clothes. They should be able to wear whatever they want. Preferably nothing!”

Despite many residents expressing their lack of interest in supporting mainstream music, there was one nominee that many Eugene residents recognized. The Black Keys, whose song, Lonely Boy is nominated for the coveted title of Record of the Year, is one band that many residents support.

The Black Keys should win record and artist of year,” Parker Jones said.  “They’re hard and freaky enough, but still have enough pop appeal.”

While several Eugene residents consider themselves music lovers, they feel that what is celebrated in the media and awarded at the Grammys is all about the money and fame and not about true artistic talent.

Lee expressed the importance of music, but added that the music industry basically says, “if people will buy this, great,” and that because of that the industry has become a “cookie cutter” of bad music.

Another opinion, expressed by Eugene resident, Andrew Agerter, was that the music industry is redefining music genres. He added that while he does like listening to country music, “country music isn’t country music anymore, it’s pop,” at least in regards to the Grammy nominations for this genre.

Andrew Agerter, who requested to not be photographed, is an employee at Toy and Hobby, a local Eugene toy store.

Andrew Agerter, who requested to not be photographed, is an employee at Toy and Hobby, a local Eugene toy store.

The distaste for the Grammy nominees by members of the Eugene public should not mistaken Eugenians for not enjoying a music culture. Just not this one.

“I think music is very important,” Lee said. “But I don’t think this is music.”

The Grammy Awards will be aired on Sunday, February 10th at 8/7 c on CBS.

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